Wallace

Wallace

This handsome young puppy is called Wallace. 

He is the newest member of the family and belongs to my granddaughter Jessica and her partner Dan who live in Scotland. 

He is a Pointer and his lovely legs grow stronger and longer by the minute. Most pets love you unconditionally and are always there for you, and no matter how bad your day has been they bring you joy, make you relax and you feel better.

Acrylics on canvas. Size 12 x 16 ins

GoddessArt – Gardens

GoddessArt – The Caribbean

GoddessArt -Still Life

GoddessArt -Flowers

Cruising brings the world to my easel

Back home in my “studio” painting

Norwegian Fjords

DOUBLE CHIN

Photo by Retha Ferguson on Pexels.com

Hello Diana my problem is a bit of a double chin. I sit a lot of the day at my desk and don’t do as much exercise as I used to. Plus I am a bit overweight. How can I tighten up my jaw line? Annie Rushton London

Annie here is a few simple exercises that may help. Do not do the following exercises if you have neck problems.
Exercise 1 Swan
Sit upright on your chair, hold your head high with chin parallel to the floor. Now lift chin up and carefully take your head on back, as far as comfortable. Hold for 5 secs to lengthen out your neck like a swan. Relax and repeat 10 times.
Ex 2 Goldfish
To tighten jowl sit up as before, stick chin forward and open your mouth wide. Pull up lower jaw with a glugging and smacking movement bringing lips

Baby Fox

I have not been taught to paint animals but maybe my natural love of all creatures great and small helps me depict them. Ella, a dear horse adored by her owner Lucy, one of my granddaughters, was my first nervous attempt. I was very pleased with the result which spurred me on to paint my own cat Maisie and other people’s pets.

Baby Fox Acrylics on Canvas 12 x 12

GoddessArt – Gardens

GoddessArt – The Caribbean

GoddessArt -Still Life

GoddessArt -Flowers

Cruising brings the world to my easel

Back home in my “studio” painting

Norwegian Fjords

Exercise – Upper body, shoulders and back

Poor posture can cause many problems but can be improved. With bad posture breathing becomes more difficult and the amount of air inhaled is less. So for this reason it’s important to maintain strength and mobility of the chest and back as we get older.  For seated exercising always chose a firm upright chair (preferably without arms) shuffle your bottom to the front of seat and sit upright with feet flat on the floor.  Be aware of your posture and try to maintain a good position throughout the exercises.

To release tension in shoulders and upper back       

        Circles

Stand or sit. Bend your elbows and raise your arms to the side and simply place fingertips on your shoulders.   Keep your fingertips in position, now bring your elbows forward and together in front of your chest.   Draw a circle with your elbows lift them both up and take on out to either side and, then on back pulling your shoulder blades together, as far as comfortable.   Continue drawing imaginary circles with your elbows on down to sides and back to start position.   Repeat 5 times clockwise and 5 times anti-clockwise.

 To improve the mobility of your shoulders and upper back

       side reach & stretch

Sit or stand with feet apart.   With your right hand reach up and over your head as if climbing a rope (relax left knee if standing).   Hold position for 10 seconds. Bring arm down and reach up and over with left hand (relaxing right knee)

And hold for 10 secs.

To improve the mobility of your shoulders and upper back

       side twist

Stand or sit upright as before but concentrate on posture by pulling in your tummy.   Bend your elbows out and bring your hands up and touch your fingertips together in front of your chest.   Keeping your elbows up  twist from your waist only and take your upper body, arms and head to look around your right side (as far as comfortable.   Come back to centre and continue to twist arms and upper body to look around left side.   Keep  elbows up, fingertips touching and repeat this twisting movement 5 times to each side, working the back and shoulders.

To stretch out your chest

       chest stretch

Sit or stand.   Take both arms behind you and place your hands on your bottom.   Pull your shoulders and elbows back as far as possible.   Lift up your rib cage and feel the stretch across your chest.

Hold for 10 seconds.

To expand the chest

       lift and stretch

Sit or stand. Clasp both hands behind your back.  Lift and stretch both arms up behind you. Hold and stretch out for 10 secs.

To improve mobility of shoulders and upper back

       arm flings

Stand or sit upright in your chair face the front with elbows up and fingertips together, remember your posture.  Keep elbows up at shoulder level then open your arms taking your hands out to the sides pulling shoulder blades together as far as possible.  Keep your elbows slightly bent – don’t straighten or hyper-extend your arms, and stretch out your chest.   (Don’t poke your head forward)   Bring fingertips back together in front of chest and repeat movement 5 times breathing deeply throughout.

To stretch out your upper back and relieve back ache

       back stretch

Stand or sit back comfortably in your chair with your feet flat on the floor.   Place both hands around your right knee and lift your right foot up off the floor.   Bend forward from your waist, bring forehead down onto your knee or as far as comfortable.   Keep this position and lift your elbows up out to the sides and round out your back.   Feel the stretch and hold for 10 seconds.   Return your right foot to the floor.   Repeat movement lifting your left foot and knee up and holding the stretch for a further 10 seconds.

The following back strengthening exercises are not suitable if you suffer from osteoporosis.

To strengthen your spine

       the flyer

Lie on your tummy.   Take your arms out to your sides.   Bend your elbows and place hands on floor under shoulders palms down.  Keep your chin on floor and  breathe in.   Keep your head, chest and arms in a straight line as you breathe out and lift them up together off the floor…. like a flying bird.   Keep looking down (don’t throw your head back).  Breathe out and relax down.   Repeat 5 times.  It’s a small but strong movement so build up slowly.

To stretch out your spine

 

       The cat

Kneel down and place your hands on the floor under your shoulders with fingers facing forward.   Breathe in, pull up your tummy muscles and arch up your back (like a cat does on waking) at the same time drop your head down to look through your knees.   Hold for 10 seconds.

Relax back down, stick out your bottom and look up.   Hold that position for 10 seconds, then relax back down.

Such a good feeling, it helps ease out that stiff back!

To relax your spine

       Rest and relax

Lie on your back and support your head with a small cushion.  Place another small cushion behind your knees and thighs. Place your hands comfortably on your tummy.  Breathe in deeply, taking the breath into your abdomen, feel the rise and fall of your tum with your fingers. Close your eyes, continue breathing deeply and relax for a few minutes.  Take care getting up off the floor. Turn onto your side, then push yourself up onto one knee and carefully stand up.

Lucky me in amongst Penguins – Falkland Islands

Having been lucky enough to spend wonderful times travelling the world I have come to appreciate the variety of colourful flowers, animals and birds to be found in other countries.

GoddessArt – Gardens

GoddessArt – The Caribbean

GoddessArt -Still Life

GoddessArt -Flowers

Cruising brings the world to my easel

Back home in my “studio” painting

Norwegian Fjords

Age is mind over Matter” and if you don’t mind it doesn’t matter!

Photo by Edu Carvalho on Pexels.com

Fitness is an attitude of mind; I believe “Age is mind over Matter” and if you don’t mind it doesn’t matter!  Ageing is inevitable, a depressing thought and nothing we can do about it, or is there? No, we can’t add years to life but we can add “life” to the years we have!  Maintaining good health enables us to pursue ambitions, hopes and dreams with many older people continuing to lead interesting lives.  Feeling well helps us enjoy the increase in longevity by giving us a sense of wellbeing, relaxation and confidence.

Being fit is being able to do the things you want to do, when you want to do them.  Maintaining fitness should be a necessity of life, not an option! People who get it right may experience a decrease of some physical ability in their 60’s whilst others not at all! Many individuals enter advanced old age still performing at the level of younger adults.

Pensioners now outnumber children for the first time in British history. “Grey power” is growing and without the social and economic restrictions of the past, have the opportunity to travel, make new relationships or continue with further education, irrespective of age, gender, colour, class or creed. So youth had better start realising that there is life after sixty!

Ageing and inability is not the same thing, trouble is today we use our brain instead of our brawn, to the detriment of our physical wellbeing. We sit around too much in work and home, with heart disease, joint problems, osteoporosis and digestive disorders the end results. We need to get out of the habit of disguising physical and some mental problems as “just old age creeping on”.

Recent research by the Mental Health Foundation revealed that just 10 minutes brisk walking also improves one’s mental state by increasing self-esteem and reducing stress and anxiety. It concluded that people who regularly exercise have a 20 – 30% lower risk of depression and dementia. When we’re active chemicals called endorphins are released giving us the “feel good” factor.

Wellbeing is not just about the Body, it’s about the Mind and Spirit too. Being socially active can help reduce feelings of loneliness, anxiety, stress and worry.  So get out there, and get chatting. Talking through personal worries with others can half a problem, or at least put it into perspective!

Cheeky monkey

Actually he is a young orangutan and the name orangutan means “man of the forest” in the Malay language. In the lowland forests in which they reside, orangutans live solitary existences.

They feast on wild fruits like lychees, mangosteens and figs, and slurp water from holes in trees. They make nests in trees of vegetation to sleep at night and rest during the day. Adult male orangutans can weigh up to 200 pounds but this little chap has a long way to go.

I was inspired and amused to paint him and decided he would appeal to younger friends of mine.  I was right!

Acrylics on canvas. Size 12 x 16 ins